MACK Chassis:

RDW

Captain
MFDPhoto1

That Mack tanker was big and impressive. But there was issues, which I never heard or looked into the whole story. This tanker was originally built by Steeldraulics. I have pics of it when they first got it, I'll try to post them when I can.
 

nappc

Lieutenant
Has anyone ever seen a Mack Granite with a crewcab? I know that FDNY had some crewcab Rs back around 1970, but that is about all I have seen. I guess it can be done, but it is probably more economical to go with a factory crewcab from International or Freightliner.
 

bulldogboy

Lieutenant
nappc:

Cobleskill, NY Fire Department Engine 1 is a Mack "Granite" with an enclosed crew module
mounted between the cab and body. I don't know who built the body. Their Engine 2 is a
Mack "R" model with an open jump seat area behind the cab. They also have a Mack "CH"
model tanker. My kind of department.

Re: military refuelers converted to fire tankers. There are quite a few former USAF refuelers
being used as fire tankers in New England. Most of them are built on 1970s model Dodge
chassis: Tyringham, MA, West Stockbridge, MA, Mendon, MA among others. There is a Mack
chassis tanker in service in Newbury, MA. Newark, VT, in the NEK, once had a Mack refueler
but I don't think that it was ever put into service.
 

nappc

Lieutenant
Mack recently announced that they are producing "medium" duty Granite chassis. Now, if they would just offer a crewcab option.
 

bulldogboy

Lieutenant
nappc said:
Mack recently announced that they are producing "medium" duty Granite chassis. Now, if they would just offer a crewcab option.
The new Mack is called the "Granite MHD" (Medium Heavy Duty). It will be equipped with a Cummins engine
and either an automatic or standard transmission. It is aimed at customers who do not need the capabilities
of the regular "Granite" model. One targeted market is municipal governments. I do not know about a
crewcab but Mack once offered a crewcab "MS" model aimed at fire and utility services.

bulldogboy
 

mill_fire521

Firefighter
The new Cobleskill Mack Granite's bodywork was built by 4 Guys. I am attempting to get 360 photos of it, as I am going to make a 1:64 scale kitbash of it.

Trav!
 

Box 2565

Engine 16 Box Responses
Staff member
Chicopee, Massachusetts has this early (1915 or so) Mack chassis with a hose body by some unknown builder. There is what appears to be a name plate on the hose basket but unfortunately it isn't readable.
 

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bulldogboy

Lieutenant
Box 2565 said:
Chicopee, Massachusetts has this early (1915 or so) Mack chassis with a hose body by some unknown builder. There is what appears to be a name plate on the hose basket but unfortunately it isn't readable.
Chicopee's Mack is a "Junior" model a lighter duty companion to the heavier "Senior" chassis. According to
Harvey Eckart in his Mack fire apparatus books, the early Mack fire apparatus had bodies built by James
Boyd and Brother. Around 1914 Mack started to build their own fire bodies. Chicopee's could be a Boyd
or Mack body.

One interesting aspect of the "Junior" and "Senior" chassis was the steering. "Juniors" had standard left hand
steering but right hand steering was an option. Conversely, "Seniors" had standard right hand steering but
left hand steering was available. Boy, when you think of the truck committee arguments about options today,
these early committees must have had lively discussions about what side to put the steering wheel on. Then,
there were probably members who wondered why they had to get rid of the horses anyway.

bulldogboy
 
START WATER said:
The ex military refuler was used to refuel aircarft and never used to the best of my knowledge to fight fires or used in resupply

It does have a pump and i have seen they with cross lays over top the pump so I assume some how they rigged up some piping .

I have found in my many yeqrs of firefighting etc ,when you start making something as big as you can it becomes a night mare . A vol co near me cut the frame on a cf mack and extended it to be a heavy rescue .

the usaf built the p15 and thern found out they don't fit in any fire station , so the had to build a extension to house them and they were still to ,short on height , there goes the idea of one blue print for everyone out the door . just my three cents (I got paid yesterday )lololololo always open for emails battlelamp@aol.com
,
You're correct, Startwater. I served 23 years as an aircraft maintenance crew chief and thus spent many hours at the other end of that Mack's hose! I believe it was designated the R-11 refueler and I don't ever recall them used as anything but aircraft refuelers. There were other types of trucks for refueling other things. And I believe even the Civil Engineering folks used different vehicles for their water needs.
 
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