Fire trucks are supposed to Red ! Right ?

Bs918

Firefighter
ire Trucks Are Supposed To Be Red, Right?
Not If You Want To Reduce Accidents

Red may be the traditional color of fire engines, but human factors and ergonomics research finds that lime-yellow fire vehicles are less likely to be involved in accidents.

Findings

Picture a fire truck and you are likely to see red – fire engine red. But when it comes to safety, human factors and ergonomics research paints a different picture. Much of human factors and ergonomics research relies upon psychological research done on human visual and auditory perception. This research shows that because the color-transmitting cones in our eyes don’t work well in the dark, some colors are easier for us to see at night. We are most sensitive to greenish-yellow colors under dim conditions, making lime shades easiest to see in dim lighting.

Researchers Stephen S. Solomon and James G. King (volunteer firefighters themselves) were aware of these perceptual differences when they analyzed accident data from the Dallas Fire Department. In the 1970’s and early 1980’s, the City of Dallas started replacing its all-red fire vehicles with lime-yellow fire vehicles with white upper cabs. After the early 1980’s, the fire department bought red vehicles with white cabs. During their four year study published in 1995, Solomon and King found that the risk of a visibility-related, multiple-vehicle accident may be as much as three times greater for red or red/white fire pumpers compared to lime-yellow/white pumpers. The results also show that when lime-yellow/white fire emergency vehicles are involved in an accident, the likelihood of injury or towaway damage is less than for red or red/white vehicles involved in an accident. An earlier study by Solomon involving nine cities and 750,000 fire-vehicle trips found that lime-yellow fire pumpers were half as likely as red fire pumpers to be involved in intersection accidents.
 

RealJeep

Probie
That data is so old and flawed that sensible people disregard it as junk science. Color has little bearing in relation to crashes and there's no excuse for not operating your rig with due care, no matter what color it is. I could drive a midnight black rig into eternity and be safe because there's no emergency so dire that I need to endanger my crew by driving recklessly!
 

firemedicburr

Firefighter
The city I live in was going to be spec'ing a new tower. A former chief started a huge stink in city council and in the local paper because they were going to go from his beloved slime lime back to red. Being a former city firefighter/paramedic, I had too much ammo to let him try to give old and inaccurate info to the public. In the early eighties he convinced city council that his color was so safe, every city vehicle except the police cars were painted slime lime, even the garbage trucks. His first truck painted green totaled out a car at an intersection, and on a perfectly clear day on a striaght section of road, a pick-up slammed into the back of a slime garbage truck with flashing yellow lights. All water and waste water treatment vehicles are now white with a green stripe, and street division vehicles are white with orange stripes, including the garbage trucks. All new fire vehicles are red now too. ;D
 
C

chechnya

Guest
RealJeep said:
That data is so old and flawed that sensible people disregard it as junk science. Color has little bearing in relation to crashes and there's no excuse for not operating your rig with due care, no matter what color it is. I could drive a midnight black rig into eternity and be safe because there's no emergency so dire that I need to endanger my crew by driving recklessly!
There i fixed it for you.


http://www.scienceblog.com/community/older/1997/A/199700494.html
http://sunnyvale.ca.gov/reports/1997-08/97-350.htm
 

Old Battery

Firefighter
Underwood4000 said:
Red is easier to keep clean. And looks better when waxed.
I have to disagree with that. I own two bright red vehicles, and no matter how well-waxed they (always) are, they look horrible with water spots after the slightest rain, especially in the springtime when there is a green haze of pollen on everything. From my experience, dirt is always harder to see on a white vehicle, at least from a distance.
 

RealJeep

Probie
chechnya said:
RealJeep said:
That data is so old and flawed that sensible people disregard it as junk science. Color has little bearing in relation to crashes and there's no excuse for not operating your rig with due care, no matter what color it is. I could drive a midnight black rig into eternity and be safe because there's no emergency so dire that I need to endanger my crew by driving recklessly!
There i fixed it for you.
I'm a fireman not an english major. Obviously you are not the former or you wouldn't feel the need to correct someone elses sentence structure and/or spelling. Feel free to correct this too if it somehow makes you feel better. Modified by Moderator WEFR 15 4-29-09 15:21
 

firetrux

Firefighter
I'm a fireman not an english major. Obviously you are not the former or you wouldn't feel the need to correct someone elses sentence structure and/or spelling. Feel free to correct this too if it somehow makes you feel better. [/quote]

Actually, chechnya highlighted the best part of your post and did not change any spelling that I can see. So your attack was unwarranted. I love the line about "driving the midnight black rig into eternity."
 

Engine33Truck

Assistant Chief
firemedicburr said:
The city I live in was going to be spec'ing a new tower. A former chief started a huge stink in city council and in the local paper because they were going to go from his beloved slime lime back to red. Being a former city firefighter/paramedic, I had too much ammo to let him try to give old and inaccurate info to the public. In the early eighties he convinced city council that his color was so safe, every city vehicle except the police cars were painted slime lime, even the garbage trucks. His first truck painted green totaled out a car at an intersection, and on a perfectly clear day on a striaght section of road, a pick-up slammed into the back of a slime garbage truck with flashing yellow lights. All water and waste water treatment vehicles are now white with a green stripe, and street division vehicles are white with orange stripes, including the garbage trucks. All new fire vehicles are red now too. ;D
Do you or anyone else have any articles or anything that disproved the "slime lime is more visible" crap?
 

firemedicburr

Firefighter
I don't have any currently, but I searched the net and found several studies about Slime being more visible under the most weather and lighting conditions. They all concluded that the emergency vehicle driver and vehicle recognition were more important than any single color or color combination.
 
color don't mean a thing the faa has a color they want on arff figs to be seen , i jin iraq arff rigs are painted tan .

like the ff before i don't cARE what color anything is its how hou diver it safelyr abnd operate it wasy too many ff's new horns sirens and bells for a alarm system we run dry no lights and no sirens and we are still threr in three or fiour minutes for the oilburner , food on the steove alarm systerms etc On bas ei worked on wrote downb the numbersd of the aslastmds and when nthr storm wa over twe restired the systes id we gor a 911 caLL LAND ALARM THREN WE ROLLED ONE FF BITCHED ABOUT WEDID THING S SO HR WAS DETAIUKE TO THE RUBBSIU TRUC T RUCK

TERE IS NBOI REASON TO GO NUTS IN THE THUNDER STRIOFM
 

cfb

Lieutenant
it does not matter the color i have seen,
red,blue,green,yellow,slime,and other color fire trucks in a crash,
ppl do not care the color, they just pull out in front of them and then blame the depts for speeding or some 'B'S' like that,
 
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